Carbon sequestration and storage by Gainesville's urban forest

  • Authors: Escobedo, Francisco; Seitz, Jennifer A.; Zipperer, Wayne
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: University of Florida-IFAS, EDIS FOR 210.

Abstract

Climate change is a world-wide issue, and it may seem as if only actions by national governments can work effectively against it. In fact individuals and small communities, too, can make wise choices and impacts. Communities can mitigate climate change through reducing fossil fuel consumption and good management of its urban forest. Urban trees can reduce concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide by storing carbon in their roots, stems, and branches. Urban forests can also help reduce carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel-based power plants because their shade and wind protection reduces energy consumption for heating and cooling buildings. By estimating the amount of carbon removed by trees, we can determine the role of urban forests in mitigating climate change and also assign an economic value to the amount of carbon sequestered by an urban forest.

  • Citation: Escobedo, Francisco; Seitz, Jennifer A.; Zipperer, Wayne 2009. Carbon sequestration and storage by Gainesville's urban forest. University of Florida-IFAS, EDIS FOR 210.
  • Posted Date: November 10, 2009
  • Modified Date: February 5, 2010
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