Family by environment interactions for loblolly and slash pine plantations in the southeastern United States

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  • Authors: Roth, Brian E.; Jokela, Eric J.; Martin, Timothy A.; Huber, Dudley A.; White, Timothy L.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 35-41.

Abstract

Few studies have quantified the combined effects of silvicultural treatments and genetic improvement on unit area production of full-sib family blocks of loblolly and slash pine. We examined genotype (family) by environmental interactions (G x E) through age five years using a factorial experiment consisting of silvicultural treatment intensity, planting density and full-sib families Five years after planting, both loblolly and slash pine demonstrated significant interactions among several factors: G by site (p < 0.028 and p < 0.016 respectively) and G by silvicultural treatment intensity (p < 0.055 and p < 0.059 for basal area and standing stem volume). G by silvicultural treatment interactions were positive, large and of the scale-type effe. . Changes in slash pine family rankings between sites were partly explained by a combination of fusiform rust infection [Cronartium quercum (Berk.) Miyabe ex Shirai f. sp. fusiforme] and wind damage from the 2004 hurricane season.

  • Citation: Roth, Brian E.; Jokela, Eric J.; Martin, Timothy A.; Huber, Dudley A.; White, Timothy L. 2010. Family by environment interactions for loblolly and slash pine plantations in the Southeastern United States. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 35-41.
  • Posted Date: July 1, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 9, 2010
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