Long-term affects of a single P fertilization on Hedley P pools in a South Carolina loblolly pine plantation

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  • Authors: Miller, Bradley W.; Fox, Thomas R.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 75-78.

Abstract

While phosphorus (P) fertilization increases plant available or “labile” P immediately after fertilization, it is uncertain how it influences P pools over the long term in forest soils. Phosphorus pools from a 22-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) fertilization study were quantified using the Hedley sequential fractionation procedure, Mehlich-1, and Mehlich-3 soil tests. The Hedley fractionation procedure partitions the extracted P into six fractions, which are then defined as labile, moderately labile, and recalcitrant P pools. After 22 years, fertilization effects were limited to the surface horizon. The largest response to fertilization in this study was an increase in the Hedley recalcitrant P pools in the 0 to 10 cm soil horizon. Mehlich-3 extractable P was significantly (p = 0.02) larger in the 0 to 10 cm soil horizon of the fertilized treatment compared to the control. Our results suggest the largest portion of applied P has remained in the surface soil horizon and has the potential to increase site quality.

  • Citation: Miller, Bradley W.; Fox, Thomas R. 2010. Long-term affects of a single P fertilization on Hedley P pools in a South Carolina loblolly pine plantation. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 75-78.
  • Posted Date: July 6, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 9, 2010
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