Efficacy of ‘hack and squirt’ application of imazapyr, triclopyr, and glyphosate to control the invasive tree species Chinese tallowtree

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  • Authors: Gresham, Charles A.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 121-122.

Abstract

In May 2005, 12 plots approximately 21 by 27 m each were established on the exterior bank of a dredge spoil area in Georgetown, SC. The tree cover was primarily Chinese tallowtree, but there were also live oak trees in each plot. Also in May 2005, Chinese tallowtree s (d.b.h. > 2.4 cm) in three randomly selected plots received a ‘hack and squirt’ application of imazapyr (50 percent v/v Habitat), tallowtrees in three plots received triclopyr (50 percent v/v Garlon 4) by ‘hack and squirt’ injection, and the tallowtrees in three plots received glyphosate (undiluted AquaNeet) by ‘hack and squirt’ injection. Three plots were an untreated control. The d.b.h. and percent defoliation of all trees (d.b.h. > 2.4 cm) were tallied in July 2005 and May 2006. The imazapyr treatment had the highest percent (96 percent in May 2006) of tallowtrees in the highest defoliation class (75 to 100 percent defoliated). Triclopyr plots had 41.3 percent in the highest class in 2006. Glyphosate plots had 62 percent in the highest class in 2006. The live oak trees (4 to 84 cm d.b.h.) did not show any herbicide damage in any treatment. These results indicate that imazapyr can be used to eradicate Chinese tallowtree by ‘hack and squirt’ injection without short-term (12 months) damage to dominant live oak trees.

  • Citation: Gresham, Charles A. 2010. Efficacy of ‘hack and squirt’ application of imazapyr, triclopyr, and glyphosate to control the invasive tree species chinese tallowtree. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 121-122.
  • Posted Date: July 7, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 10, 2010
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