Evaluating the use of enhanced oak seedlings for increased survival and growth: first-year survival

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  • Authors: Moree, Joshua L.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Hodges, John D.; Londo, Andrew J.; Godwin, K. David
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 165-169.

Abstract

Oaks (Quercus spp.) are very important in the southern landscape for timber production and wildlife habitat. More landowners are attempting to establish oak plantations as the demand for wood products and wildlife habitat continues to increase. These attempts are not always successful with early growth and survival becoming major concerns. In this study, 6,480 1-0 bareroot Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer) and white oak (Quercus alba L.) seedlings were planted in February 2005 on the Malmaison and Copiah County Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in MA. Half of the seedlings are high quality nursery-run seedlings and the other half are “enhanced” seedlings grown under a special nursery protocol developed by Dr. Paul Kormanik. The impact of various planting method, competition control, and fertilization treatments on seedling survival was evaluated during the first year following planting. First year survival did not differ significantly among nursery stocks. Seedling survival differed significantly among competition control and planting method treatments at Malmaison WMA.

  • Citation: Moree, Joshua L.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Hodges, John D.; Londo, Andrew J.; Godwin, K. David 2010. Evaluating the use of enhanced oak seedlings for increased survival and growth: first-year survival. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 165-169.
  • Posted Date: July 22, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 10, 2010
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