Releasing red oak reproduction using a growing season application of Oust

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  • Authors: Schuler, Jamie L.; Stephens, John
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 201-205.

Abstract

In most cases, newly harvested upland oak stands contain sufficient numbers of red oak stems to form a fully stocked oak stand in the future. Unfortunately, many stands will not reach full stocking of oak due to intense competition from other non-oak reproduction. There are few feasible options to release established oak reproduction from other broadleaf woody or non-woody vegetation. This study assessed the year 1 results of an over-the-top application of the herbicide Oust (0.2 kg/ha) during the growing season to reduce the competitiveness of non-oak species. The first year after treatment, Oust reduced the total height and diameter of non-oak species by about 20 percent without affecting mortality or growth of red oak stems. The application of Oust over the top of actively growing mixed oak stand, while not a labeled use, does show promise as an effective and operationally feasible release treatment.

  • Citation: Schuler, Jamie L.; Stephens, John 2010. Releasing red oak reproduction using a growing season application of Oust. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 201-205.
  • Posted Date: July 22, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 10, 2010
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