Impact of Hurricane Ivan on the regional longleaf pine growth study: is there a relation to site or stand conditions?

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  • Authors: Kush, John S.; Gilbert, John C.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 259-261.

Abstract

The US Forest Service Regional Longleaf Pine Growth Study (RLGS) began its eighth re-measurement (40th year) during 2004 autumn. The study has 305 plots of which 171 plots are located on the Escambia Experimental Forest (EEF) in Brewton AL. EEF is operated by the U.S. Forest Service in cooperation with the T.R. Miller Mill Company. The RLGS has plots distributed across a range of age, site and density (basal area) classes. On September 16, 2004 Hurricane Ivan hit the Alabama coast and severely impacted numerous RLGS plots. Nearly 1/3 of the EEF was impacted. Thirteen plots, which had pole-size trees, were entirely lost. Another 125 plots experienced some type of mortality. The greatest damage was on plots with the lowest density or located near openings. Nearly 30 percent of trees greater than 80 years old had their tops snapped off. There was little relation between these site conditions and impacts from the hurricane.

  • Citation: Kush, John S.; Gilbert, John C. 2010. Impact of hurricane Ivan on the regional longleaf pine growth study: is there a relation to site or stand conditions? In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 259-261.
  • Posted Date: August 4, 2010
  • Modified Date: November 12, 2020
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