Pre- and post-clearcut tree species distribution in two physiographic regions of the Shawnee National Forest, Illinois

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  • Authors: Long, Michael A.; Groninger, John W.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 447-449.

Abstract

Seventy-four upland oak stands distributed across the Shawnee National Forest, Illinois were inventoried 15 to 26 years after clearcutting and harvest records examined to determine the effect of physiographic province on the distribution of oak and associated tree species before and after clearcutting. Oak represented 62 percent of harvest volume in the Shawnee Hills versus 51 percent in the Ozark Plateau. The latter is characterized by high site quality resulting from the deposition of wind blown loess soils originating from the adjacent Mississippi River floodplain. Oak proportion based on stem density was significantly less in post-clearcut stands in both physiographic provinces but a pre-harvest trend toward relatively higher values in the Shawnee Hills (21 percent) versus the Ozark Plateau (11 percent) persisted. The increased dominance of yellow-poplar across the Shawnee Hills could have important management implications if this species persists.

  • Citation: Long, Michael A.; Groninger, John W. 2010. Pre- and post-clearcut tree species distribution in two physiographic regions of the Shawnee National Forest, Illinois. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 447-449.
  • Posted Date: August 13, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 14, 2010
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