Effects of pre- and post-harvest site preparation treatments on natural regeneration success in a mixed hardwood stand after 10 years

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Schubert, Martin R.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 451-454.

Abstract

Advance regeneration, sprouts and seeds are sources of reproduction in the regeneration of mixed hardwood stands following harvest. The control of undesirable, non-commercial, competing vegetation is a common technique in site preparation to promote the establishment and growth of desirable species. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of pre- and post-harvest site preparation treatments in the regeneration of an upland hardwood stand near Oak Ridge, TN. Four site preparation treatments (pre- and post-harvest slashing, with and without herbicide stump treatment) and a control (no slashing or herbicide treatment) were implemented. Each set of five treatments was replicated six times. The regeneration harvest was conducted during the winter of 1996-1997. After ten growing seasons, there was little statistical difference in species composition between treatments. Even though many undesirable existing stems were controlled by the pre- and post-harvest site preparation treatments, the proliferation of light-seeded species, primarily yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), red maple (Acer rubrum), black cherry (Prunus serotina), and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) overcompensated for the various site preparation treatments.

  • Citation: Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Schubert, Martin R. 2010. Effects of pre- and post-harvest site preparation treatments on natural regeneration success in a mixed hardwood stand after 10 years. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 451-454.
  • Posted Date: August 13, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 14, 2010
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.