Production of willow oak acorns in an Arkansas greentree reservoir: an evaluation of regeneration and waterfowl forage potential

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  • Authors: Guttery, M. R.; Ezell, A. W.; Hodges, J. D.; Londo, A. J.; Maiers, R. P.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 455-460.

Abstract

Greentree reservoirs (GTRs) provide critical habitat for a broad suite of species. Unfortunately, many GTRs are mismanaged, leading to undesirable successional changes and possible habitat degradation. This study evaluates willow oak acorn production in terms of the potential for natural regeneration and waterfowl forage. During the fall and winter of 2004 and 2005, acorns were collected biweekly from 40 overstory willow oaks distributed throughout the study site. Once collected, acorns were subjected to a fl oat test and counted. During both years of the study, production of sound acorns was well above the generally accepted giving-up density of 50 kg/ha of forage for waterfowl. Further, comparing germination rates observed at the study site to those predicted in the literature indicates that willow oak acorns are germinating at a higher rate than expected. This study further emphasizes the importance of gaining a better understanding of artificially flooded hardwood systems.

  • Citation: Guttery, M. R.; Ezell, A. W.; Hodges, J. D.; Londo, A. J.; Maiers, R. P. 2010. Production of willow oak acorns in an Arkansas greentree reservoir: an evaluation of regeneration and waterfowl forage potential. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 455-460.
  • Posted Date: August 13, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 14, 2010
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