Evaluating growth assumptions using diameter or radial increments in natural even-aged longleaf pine

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  • Authors: Gilbert, John C.; Meldahl, Ralph S.; Rayamajhi, Jyoti N.; Kush, John S.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 539-544.

Abstract

When using increment cores to predict future growth, one often assumes future growth is identical to past growth for individual trees. Once this assumption is accepted, a decision has to be made between which growth estimate should be used, constant diameter growth or constant basal area growth. Often, the assumption of constant diameter growth is used due to the ease of calculations. To determine which assumption is appropriate for natural even-aged stands of longleaf pine, permanent plot data from the U.S. Forest Service Regional Longleaf Pine Growth Study (RLGS) can be analyzed. Data from the RLGS cover a range of age classes, basal area classes, and site indices across the Gulf States. Plots have been measured every 5 years since the establishment of the study in 1964. Results show constant basal area growth to be the more valid assumption for natural even-aged longleaf pine.

  • Citation: Gilbert, John C.; Meldahl, Ralph S.; Rayamajhi, Jyoti N.; Kush, John S. 2010. Evaluating growth assumptions using diameter or radial increments in natural even-aged longleaf pine. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 539-544.
  • Posted Date: August 17, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 19, 2010
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