Segmented polynomial taper equation incorporating years since thinning for loblolly pine plantations

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  • Authors: Holley, A. Gordon; Lynch, Thomas B.; Stiff, Charles T.; Stansfield, William
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 547-548.

Abstract

Data from 108 trees felled from 16 loblolly pine stands owned by Temple-Inland Forest Products Corp. were used to determine effects of years since thinning (YST) on stem taper using the Max–Burkhart type segmented polynomial taper model. Sample tree YST ranged from two to nine years prior to destructive sampling. In an effort to equalize sample sizes, tree data were classified into three groups: 2 and 3, 4 and 5, and 6 to 9 years since thinning. A modified Max-Burkhart segmented taper model was fitted to each of the three YST categories in order to detect any trends in the coefficients. Multiple coefficients were then expressed as functions of YST. The resulting three-segment equation included the independent variable of YST. The resulting taper equation predicts expected changes in shape of loblolly pine trees following thinning activities.

  • Citation: Holley, A. Gordon; Lynch, Thomas B.; Stiff, Charles T.; Stansfield, William 2010. Segmented polynomial taper equation incorporating years since thinning for loblolly pine plantations. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 547-548.
  • Posted Date: August 17, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 19, 2010
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