Assessment of the 1998–2001 drought impact on forest health in southeastern forests: an analysis of drought severity using FHM data

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Klos, R. J.; Wang, G. G.; Bauerle, W. L.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 553-554.

Abstract

Analyses of forest health indicators monitored through the Forest Health and Monitoring (FHM) program suggested that weather was the most important cause of tree mortality. Drought is of particular importance among weather variables because several global climate change scenarios predicted more frequent and/or intense drought in the Southeastern United States. During the years of 1998-2001, extensive forest areas within the Southeastern United States experienced severe drought conditions (defined by the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI)). In this study, we used FHM data to examine the effect of drought induced moisture stress on forest growth, mortality and changes in crown condition at a regional scale.

  • Citation: Klos, R.J.; Wang, G.G.; Bauerle, W.L. 2010. Assessment of the 1998–2001 drought impact on forest health in southeastern forests: an analysis of drought severity using FHM data. In: Stanturf, John A., ed. 2010. Proceedings of the 14th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–121. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 553-554.
  • Posted Date: August 17, 2010
  • Modified Date: October 19, 2010
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.