The increasing importance of small-scale forestry: evidence from family forest ownership patterns in the United States

  • Authors: Zhang, Y.; Liao, X.; Butler, B.J.; Schelhas, J.
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Small-scale Forestry 8(1):1-14.
  • DOI: 10.1007/s11842-008-9050-6

Abstract

The state-level distribution of the size of family forest holdings in the contiguous United States was examined using data collected by the USDA Forest Service in 1993 and 2003. Regressions models were used to analyze the factors influencing the mean size and structural variation among states and between the two periods. Population density, percent of the population at least 65 years of age, percent of the population residing in urban areas, per capita income, income inequality, and per capita private forestland were found to be significantly correlated with the structure of landholding size. This paper suggests that the number and proportion of small-scale family forest owners in the United States are both increasing due to the increasing importance of non-timber amenities to forest landowners.

  • Citation: Zhang, Y.; Liao, X.; Butler, B.J.; Schelhas, J. 2009. The increasing importance of small-scale forestry: evidence from family forest ownership patterns in the United States. Small-scale Forestry 8(1):1-14.
  • Keywords: Non-industrial private forests, seemingly unrelated regression, ordinary least squares regression, national woodland owner survey, parcelization
  • Posted Date: February 12, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 16, 2010
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.