Torrefaction? What’s that?

  • Authors: Mitchell, D.; Elder, T.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of 2010 COFE: 33rd Annual Meeting of the Council on Forest Engineering. Auburn, AL: June 6-9, 2010. [CD-ROM] 1-7.

Abstract

Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical process that reduces the moisture content of wood and transforms it into a brittle, char-type material. The thermo-chemical process can reduce the mass of wood by 20-30% resulting in a denser, higher-valued product that can be transported more economically than traditional wood chips. Through torrefaction, wood may retain 90% of the energy value. This energy dense end-product can be used as a coal replacement or co-fired/co-milled with coal in electricity generating power plants. Torrefied wood can be used as a soil amendment, for backyard grilling, residential heating, or as a feedstock in gasification processes. This paper is a literature synthesis that will present (1) the torrefaction process, (2) current developments in commercial torrefaction equipment, (3) characteristics of and markets for torrefied wood, and (4) feedstock specifications for torrefaction.

  • Citation: Mitchell, D.; Elder, T., 2010. Torrefaction? What’s that? In: Proceedings of 2010 COFE: 33rd Annual Meeting of the Council on Forest Engineering. Auburn, AL: June 6-9, 2010. [CD-ROM] 1-7.
  • Posted Date: September 20, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 21, 2010
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