Overcoming obstacles to interspecies hybridization of ash

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  • Authors: Koch, Jennifer L.; Carey, David W.; Mason, Mary E.; Islam-Faridi, M. Nurul.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings
  • Source: In: Michler, Charles H.; Ginzel, Matthew D., eds. 2010. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America; 2010 March 9-11; West Lafayette, IN. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-72. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 41-44.

Abstract

Tree species that share a long co-evolutionary history with insects and pathogens are likely to have developed mechanisms of resistance that allow them to coexist. When insects and pathogens are introduced to different parts of the world, high levels of susceptibility can be observed, presumably in part due to the lack of co-evolutionary history between the insect (or pathogen) and host. In such cases, use of non-native tree species as a source of resistance for introgression into native susceptible tree species can be quite helpful.

  • Citation: Koch, Jennifer L.; Carey, David W.; Mason, Mary E.; Islam-Faridi, M. Nurul. 2010. Overcoming obstacles to interspecies hybridization of ash. In: Michler, Charles H.; Ginzel, Matthew D., eds. 2010. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America; 2010 March 9-11; West Lafayette, IN. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-72. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 41-44.
  • Posted Date: December 29, 2010
  • Modified Date: December 29, 2010
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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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