Site preparation burning to improve southern Appalachian pine-hardwood stands: photosynthesis, water relations, and growth of planted Pinus strobus during establishment

Abstract

Fire is now prescribed as a silvicultural treatment to restore low-diversity, low-productivity sites in southern Appalachian forests.Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) is then planted on many of these sites to provide a mixed pine-oak forest type (see Swift et al. 1993).Fire reduces sprout vigor, which delays growth of Kalmia latifolia L., a common understory shrub competitor, and encourages tree species such as oak to sprout from the groundline and thereby produce oak that are less likely to develop rot (Van Lear 1991). A major objective of fire is to reduce competition to the planted seedlings; however, little is known regarding the effectiveness of the treatment.

  • Citation: Elliott, Katherine J.; Vose, James M. 1993. Site preparation burning to improve southern Appalachian pine-hardwood stands: photosynthesis, water relations, and growth of planted Pinus strobus during establishment. Can. J. For. Res. 23: 2278-2285. 8p.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.