Update on exotic ash collection for hybrid breeding and survey for EAB-resistance in native North American species

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  • Authors: Mason, Mary E.; Herms, Daniel A.; Carey, David W.; Knight, Kathleen S.; Faridi, Nurul I.; Koch, Jennifer.
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: Other
  • Source: In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 104.

Abstract

Contrary to the high levels of devastation observed on North American ash species infested with emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), reports from Asia indicate that EAB-induced destruction of Asian ash species is limited to stressed trees. This indicates that Asian ash species have co-evolved resistance, or at least a high degree of tolerance, to this insect. We are investigating whether inter-species hybrids between Asian and North American ash species can be used to introgress EAB resistance into native ash species.

  • Citation: Mason, Mary E.; Herms, Daniel A.; Carey, David W.; Knight, Kathleen S.; Faridi, Nurul I.; Koch, Jennifer. 2011. Update on exotic ash collection for hybrid breeding and survey for EAB-resistance in native North American species. In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 104.
  • Posted Date: April 14, 2011
  • Modified Date: April 14, 2011
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