Methods used for analyzing the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management on sediment in the Eastern United States

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  • Authors: Marion, Daniel A.; Clingenpeel, J. Alan
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 308-326.

Abstract

Previous chapters have described how various resource systems within a watershed can experience cumulative effects from fuel management activities like prescribed burning. As noted before, a cumulative effect is “the impact on the environment which results from the incremental impact of the action when added to other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future actions, regardless of what agency (Federal or non-Federal) or person undertakes such other actions. Cumulative effects can result from individually minor but collectively significant actions taking place over a period of time” (40 C.F.R. § 1508.7).

  • Citation: Marion, Daniel A.; Clingenpeel, J. Alan 2012. Methods used for analyzing the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management on sediment in the Eastern United States. In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 308-326.
  • Posted Date: July 31, 2012
  • Modified Date: July 31, 2012
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