Age structure of a southern pine stand following 72 years of uneven-aged silviculture

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  • Authors: Bragg, Don C.
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 29-30.

Abstract

Work on uneven-aged silviculture in southern pine stands on the Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF) began in the 1930s, when a number of 16.2-ha compartments were placed into a series of demonstration projects and studies (Reynolds 1980). Two of these compartments, the Good and Poor Farm Forestry Forties, have been maintained continuously in this silvicultural regime since 1937. However, for all of the long history of the CEF, we have not systematically aged the loblolly (Pinus taeda) and shortleaf (Pinus echinata) pine-dominated Farm Forestry Forties. Rather, we have accepted decades of continuous sawtimber production as de facto evidence of uneven-aged structure.

  • Citation: Bragg, Don C. 2012. Age structure of a southern pine stand following 72 years of uneven-aged silviculture. In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 29-30.
  • Posted Date: August 28, 2012
  • Modified Date: September 25, 2012
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