Whole canopy gas exchange among elite loblolly pine families subjected to drought stress

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  • Authors: Hood, Wilson G.; Tyree, Michael C.; Dillaway, Dylan N.; Blazier, Michael A.; Sword Sayer, Mary Anne
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 157-158.

Abstract

Future climate change simulations predict that the southeastern United States will experience hydrologic patterns similar to that currently found in the Western Gulf Region, meaning, that planted elite loblolly families may be subject to drier, hotter summers (Ruosteenoja et al. 2003, Field et al. 2007). Currently, there is little research on how these fast-growing loblolly families will perform under severe, summertime drought conditions. The summer of 2010 was extremely dry in northern Louisiana. From March to October precipitation totals were 46.3 cm (54%) below the 30 year average making this one of the driest summers on record (NOAA 2010). The objectives of this study were to determine how severe drought stress effected total tree leaf area, specific light saturated photosynthesis (ASat), and canopy level light saturated photosynthesis (ACan) among four fast-growing loblolly families.

  • Citation: Hood, Wilson G.; Tyree, Michael C.; Dillaway, Dylan N.; Blazier, Michael A.; Sword Sayer, Mary Anne 2012. Whole canopy gas exchange among elite loblolly pine families subjected to drought stress. In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 157-158.
  • Posted Date: August 30, 2012
  • Modified Date: August 30, 2012
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