Identification of Important Iranian Hardwoods by Morphological Properties of Vessel Elements (Maceration process)

  • Authors: Safdari, Vahidreza; Devall, Margaret S.
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Lignocellulose 1(1):55-70.

Abstract

For the identification of small to large wood samples and various types of composites that may not provide enough of all surfaces necessary to reveal diagnostic characteristics, such as sawdust, decayed wood fragments, archeological wood, and even large wood samples, morphological and anatomical characteristics of vessels are very useful. In this research, morphological and anatomical characteristics of vessels of important Iranian hardwoods which are concentrated in the Hyrcanian zone have been studied and photographed. Wood chips (match size) were placed in equal parts of glacial acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide and were put in the oven at 60°C for 48 hours, then counted and stained on microscope slides. The results showed that identification of many wood genera via morphological and anatomical characteristics of vessel elements in the maceration process is feasible but much depends on practice and experience. Spiral thickening, perforation plates, apparent shape and size of vessel elements, and vessel-ray pits are most important characteristics in the identification of wood genera. Inter-vessel pits or vessel-fiber pitting cannot be as helpful as the above features. We strongly recommend that all wood anatomists use macerated vessel morphological and anatomical characteristics as anatomical features in their description.

  • Citation: Safdari, Vahidreza; Devall, Margaret S. 2011. Identification of Important Iranian Hardwoods by Morphological Properties of Vessel Elements (Maceration process). Lignocellulose 1(1):55-70.
  • Keywords: Hardwood identification; Maceration process; Vessel element shapes; Vessel-ray pits
  • Posted Date: September 24, 2012
  • Modified Date: September 25, 2012
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.