Artificial regeneration of northern red oak and white oak on high-quality sites: effect of root morphology and relevant biological characteristics

  • Authors: Kormanik, Paul P.; Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Tibbs, G. Thomas
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Parker, S.; Hummel, S.S., comps. Proceedings of the 2001 National Silviculture Workshop. General Technical Report PNW-GTR-546. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 83-91.

Abstract

Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Quercus alba) are important components of high-quality mesic sites and are essential as lumber species and hard mast producers. Regeneration of these species has been difficult, and their absence in newly regenerated stands is a major concern of foresters and wildlife biologists. Several important biological traits of oak species may contribute to regeneration difficulties. These primary determinable biological traits may be shade intolerance and aging, which affects their reproductive potential. These factors, coupled with incompatibility of closely related individuals, greatly hamper natural regeneration efforts by decreasing adequate advance oak regeneration for future stands. Artificial regeneration can significantly increase the oak component because large oak seedlings that exceed the suggested size of advance oak regeneration can readily be produced in forest tree nurseries with specific nursery prescriptions. Seedlings produced in this fashion can readily be evaluated. Those from the top 50 percent, based upon first-order-lateral root numbers, have proven to be very effective in artificial regeneration of stands, in establishing plantings for seed orchards, and in establishing mast-producing areas within larger forested stands.

  • Citation: Kormanik, Paul P.; Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Tibbs, G. Thomas 2002. Artificial regeneration of northern red oak and white oak on high-quality sites: effect of root morphology and relevant biological characteristics. In: Parker, S.; Hummel, S.S., comps. Proceedings of the 2001 National Silviculture Workshop. General Technical Report PNW-GTR-546. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 83-91.
  • Keywords: artificial regeneration, high-quality mesic site, northern red oak, nursery protocol, seedling evaluation, site maintenance, white oak
  • Posted Date: December 11, 2012
  • Modified Date: April 4, 2013
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.