Eucalyptus beyond its native range: Environmental issues in exotic bioenergy plantations

  • Authors: Stanturf, John A.; Vance, Eric D.; Fox, Thomas R.; Kirst, Matias
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: International Journal of Forestry Research 2013(463030):1-5

Abstract

The genus Eucalyptus is native to Australia and Indonesia but has been widely planted in many countries. Eucalyptus has proven to be particularly successful in tropical and subtropical regions. Several species are also successful in some temperate regions, but problems with sudden and severe frosts pose limitations. Current plantations around the world are dominated by the “big nine” species (E. camaldulensis, E. grandis, E. tereticornis, E. globulus, E. nitens, E. urophylla, E. saligna, E. dunnii, and E. pellita) and their hybrids, which together account for more than 90% of Eucalyptus planted forests. Much of current tree improvement efforts focus on the use of hybrids and clones, and development of genetically modified Eucalyptus is already underway.

  • Citation: Stanturf, John A.; Vance, Eric D.; Fox, Thomas R.; Kirst, Matias 2013. Eucalyptus beyond its native range: Environmental issues in exotic bioenergy plantations. International Journal of Forestry Research 2013(463030):1-5.
  • Posted Date: April 19, 2013
  • Modified Date: April 19, 2013
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.