Changing conditions and changing ecosystems: a long-term regional and transcontinental research approach on invasive species

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  • Authors: Lugo, Ariel E.; Gonzalez, Grizelle
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Dix, Mary Ellen; Britton, Kerry, editors. A dynamic invasive species research vision: Opportunities and priorities 2009-29. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-79/83. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Research and Development: 121-126

Abstract

Emerging new ecosystems are products of human activity. They occur everywhere but particularly in degraded sites and abandoned managed lands. These ecosystems have new species combinations and dominance by invasive species and appear to be increasing in land cover. As new ecosystems emerge on landscapes, issues of social values and attitudes toward alien species and naturalness increase in relevance. Despite their ecological and socioeconomic importance, however, very little empirical information exists about the basic ecology and social relevance of these ecosystems. We propose regional and transcontinental ecological and socioecological research to address questions about the structure, functioning, and ecological services of new ecosystems.

  • Citation: Lugo, Ariel E.; Gonzalez, Grizelle. 2010. Changing conditions and changing ecosystems: a long-term regional and transcontinental research approach on invasive species. In: Dix, Mary Ellen; Britton, Kerry, editors. A dynamic invasive species research vision: Opportunities and priorities 2009-29. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-79/83. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Research and Development: 121-126.
  • Keywords: invasive species, novel ecosystems, disturbance, degradation, tropical forests
  • Posted Date: August 9, 2013
  • Modified Date: September 29, 2014
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