Mitochondrial DNA haplotype distribution patterns in Pinus ponderosa (pinaceae): range-wide evolutionary history and implications for conservation

  • Authors: Potter, Kevin M.; Hipkins, Valerie D.; Mahalovich, Mary F.; Means, Robert E.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: American Journal of Botany 100(8):1562–1579.

Abstract

  • Premise of the study: Ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P. Lawson & C. Lawson) exhibits complicated patterns of morphological and genetic variation across its range in western North America. This study aims to clarify P. ponderosa evolutionary history and phylogeography using a highly polymorphic mitochondrial DNA marker, with results offering insights into how geographical and climatological processes drove the modern evolutionary structure of tree species in the region.
  • Methods: We amplified the mtDNA nad1 second intron minisatellite region for 3,100 trees representing 104 populations, and sequenced all length variants. We estimated population-level haplotypic diversity and determined diversity partitioning among varieties, races and populations. After aligning sequences of minisatellite repeat motifs, we evaluated evolutionary relationships among haplotypes.
  • Key results: The geographical structuring of the 10 haplotypes corresponded with division between Pacific and Rocky Mountain varieties. Pacific haplotypes clustered with high bootstrap support, and appear to have descended from Rocky Mountain haplotypes. A greater proportion of diversity was partitioned between Rocky Mountain races than between Pacific races. Areas of highest haplotypic diversity were the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California, northwestern California, and southern Nevada.
  • Conclusions: Pinus ponderosa haplotype distribution patterns suggest a complex phylogeographic history not revealed by other genetic and morphological data, or by the sparse paleoecological record. The results appear consistent with long-term divergence between the Pacific and Rocky Mountain varieties, along with more recent divergences not well-associated with race. Pleistocene refugia may have existed in areas of high haplotypic diversity, as well as the Great Basin, Southwestern United States/northern Mexico, and the High Plains.

  • Citation: Potter, Kevin M.; Hipkins, Valerie D.; Mahalovich, Mary F.; Means, Robert E. 2013. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype distribution patterns in Pinus ponderosa (pinaceae): range-wide evolutionary history and implications for conservation. American Journal of Botany 100(8):1562–1579.
  • Keywords: Migration; minisatellite; mitochondrial DNA; phylogeography; Pinus ponderosa ; Pinus washoensis ; Pleistocene; polymorphism
  • Posted Date: September 9, 2013
  • Modified Date: October 28, 2013
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