Early history of tree seedling nurseries in the South

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  • Authors: Barnett, James P.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
  • Source: In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., technical coordinators. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 42-46.

Abstract

The forests in the South were devastated by aggressive harvesting that began following the Civil War. By the early in the 20th century, many millions of acres of land needed reforestation. Foresighted individuals began a committed effort to restore this land to a productive condition. This effort required dedication, innovation, cooperation, and leadership. The pioneering work of people including Carl A. Schneck, Henry Hardtner, J.T. Johnson, F.O. “Red” Bateman, and Philip Wakeley helped create the foundation of reforestation and nursery technology in the South, and the forests they helped restore have become the basis of the South’s economy today.

  • Citation: Barnett, James P. 2013. Early history of tree seedling nurseries in the South. In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., technical coordinators. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 42-46.
  • Keywords: restoration of southern forests, southern pines, nursery managers, nursery production
  • Posted Date: March 24, 2014
  • Modified Date: November 13, 2014
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    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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