A site-specific approach for assessing the fire risk to structures at the wildland/urban interface

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  • Authors: Cohen, Jack
  • Publication Year: 1991
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Nodvin, S.C.; Waldrop, T.A., eds. Fire and the environment: ecological and cultural perspectives: proceedings of an international symposium, Knoxville, Tennessee, March 20-24, 1990. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-69. Ashville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 252-256.

Abstract

The essence of the wildland/urban interface fire problem is the loss of homes. The problem is not new, but is becoming increasingly important as more homes with inadequate adherence to safety codes are built at the wildland/urban interface. Current regulatory codes are inflexible. Specifications for building and site characteristics cannot be adjusted to accommodate homeowner values. USDA Forest Service Fire Research is developing a wildland/urban fire interface ignition assessment model as an alternative to current fire safety codes. This model is based on an analytical (rather than statistical) assessment of structural characteristics, site characteristics, and fire severity conditions. The model will he capable of assessing ignition risk for individual structures, and thus will be capable of accommodating homeowner preferences as they affect fire safety.

  • Citation: Cohen, Jack 1991. A site-specific approach for assessing the fire risk to structures at the wildland/urban interface. In: Nodvin, S.C.; Waldrop, T.A., eds. Fire and the environment: ecological and cultural perspectives: proceedings of an international symposium, Knoxville, Tennessee, March 20-24, 1990. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-69. Ashville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 252-256.
  • Keywords: fire, wildland/urban interface, safety codes, ignition assessment model
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: June 16, 2016
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