Black willow tree improvement: development of a biomass species for marginal agricultural land in the lower Mississippi alluvial valley

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  • Authors: Brazas Bailey, Rochelle; Rousseau, Randall J.; Gardiner, Emile; Mack, Jason C.
  • Publication Year: 2014
  • Publication Series: Abstract
  • Source: In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 263-264.

Abstract

Short rotation woody crops, such as willows (Salix spp.), continue to be examined as biomass species because of their fast growth, ease of vegetative propagation, and ability to be coppice regenerated. Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) fits well into a biomass program for the southern United States because of its ability to grow on marginal agricultural sites that are poorly drained.

  • Citation: Brazas Bailey, Rochelle; Rousseau, Randall J.; Gardiner, Emile; Mack, Jason C. 2014. Black willow tree improvement: development of a biomass species for marginal agricultural land in the lower Mississippi alluvial valley. In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 263-264.
  • Posted Date: January 22, 2015
  • Modified Date: January 22, 2015
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