Long-term response of yellow-poplar to thinning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Keyser, Tara L.; Brown, Peter M.
  • Publication Year: 2015
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.

Abstract

Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) is the most abundant individual tree species (in terms of volume) in the southern Appalachian Mountains, with Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) reports documenting a continuous increase in yellow-poplar over the recent years (Brown 2003, Schweitzer 1999, Thompson 1998). Current management efforts in evenaged yellow-poplar stands rarely include thinning operations. However, thinning prescriptions largely driven by timber-related goals and objectives were once commonplace across the region.

  • Citation: Keyser, Tara L.; Brown, Peter M. 2015. Long-term response of yellow-poplar to thinning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.
  • Posted Date: February 5, 2015
  • Modified Date: February 12, 2015
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.