Southern United States climate, land use, and forest conditions

  • Authors: Wear, David N.; Mote, Thomas L.; Shepherd, J. Marshall; Benita, K. C.; Strother, Christopher W.
  • Publication Year: 2014
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: Climate change adaption and mitigation management optionsA guide for natural resource managers in southern forest ecosystems CRC Press - Taylor and Francis

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has concluded, with 90% certainty, that human or "anthropogenic" activities (emissions of greenhouse gases, aerosols and pollution, landuse/land-cover change) have altered global temperature patterns over the past 100-150 years (IPCC 2007a). Such temperature changes have a set of cascading, and sometimes amplifying, effects on the entire global climate system, including the water cycle, cryosphere, hurricane intensity, and sea level. This chapter develops a set of scenarios for exploring potential climate and resource effects futures in the Southern United States.

  • Citation: Wear, David N.; Mote, Thomas L.; Shepherd, J. Marshall; Benita, K. C.; Strother, Christopher W. 2014. Southern United States climate, land use, and forest conditions. In: Climate change adaption and mitigation management optionsA guide for natural resource managers in southern forest ecosystems CRC Press - Taylor and Francis (pp 9- 44) 36 p.
  • Posted Date: July 23, 2015
  • Modified Date: July 23, 2015
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