The Longleaf Alliance: A Regional Longleaf Pine Recovery Effort

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  • Authors: Gjerstad, Dean; Johnson, Rhett
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 1-2

Abstract

Longleaf pine was once the dominate forest over nearly 70 percent of Alabama, ranging from just south of the Tennessee Valley to the Gulf Coast. Today longleaf represents less than 3 percent of Alabama's forest acreage. However, a dramatic recovery of this most important southern ecosystem is underway with interest and support at an all time high among landowners, agencies, and conservation groups.

  • Citation: Gjerstad, Dean; Johnson, Rhett 2002. The Longleaf Alliance: A Regional Longleaf Pine Recovery Effort. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 1-2
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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