Field Planting Containerized Longleaf Pine Seedlings

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Larson, Dale R.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 62-63

Abstract

The difficulty in establishing stands of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) by artificial regeneration techniques has been a major factor in the decline of the number of acres occupied by this species in the Southeast. Many landowners and managers have been reluctant to plant longleaf because of its history of poor survival. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) now occupy many sites that longleaf pine dominated in the past. A renewed interest in longleaf regeneration has been developed in the past several years, and a substantial number of acres are now being reforested with longleaf pine. Research, development of containerized longleaf pine seedlings, and improved management practices have done a lot to eliminate most of the difficulties encountered in artificially regenerating longleaf pine stands.

  • Citation: Larson, Dale R. 2002. Field Planting Containerized Longleaf Pine Seedlings. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 62-63
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.