Dominant forest tree mycorrhizal type mediates understory plant invasions

  • Authors: Jo, Insu; Potter, Kevin M.; Domke, Grant M.; Fei, Songlin
  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Ecology Letters
  • DOI: 10.1111/ele.12884

Abstract

Forest mycorrhizal type mediates nutrient dynamics, which in turn can influence forest community structure and processes. Using forest inventory data, we explored how dominant forest tree myc- orrhizal type affects understory plant invasions with consideration of forest structure and soil properties. We found that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) dominant forests, which are characterised by thin forest floors and low soil C : N ratio, were invaded to a greater extent by non-native inva- sive species than ectomycorrhizal (ECM) dominant forests. Understory native species cover and richness had no strong associations with AM tree dominance. We also found no difference in the mycorrhizal type composition of understory invaders between AM and ECM dominant forests. Our results indicate that dominant forest tree mycorrhizal type is closely linked with understory invasions. The increased invader abundance in AM dominant forests can further facilitate nutrient cycling, leading to the alteration of ecosystem structure and functions.

  • Citation: Jo, Insu; Potter, Kevin M.; Domke, Grant M.; Fei, Songlin 2018. Dominant forest tree mycorrhizal type mediates understory plant invasions. Ecology Letters. 21(2): 217-224. 8 p.  https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12884.
  • Keywords: Eastern USA, forest mycorrhizal type, nutrient cycling, plant-soil feedback, temperate forests, understory invasions.
  • Posted Date: February 5, 2018
  • Modified Date: March 8, 2018
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