Effect of distance between baited multiple-funnel traps on catches of bark and wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Cerambycidae) and associates in North-Central Georgia

Abstract

In the fall of 2011, we examined the effects of inter–trap distances of 2, 6, and 12 m on catches of bark and wood-boring beetles (and associates) in traps baited with either ethanol a-pinene (EA) or ipsenol ipsdienol (SD) in a stand of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., in northern  Georgia.  Traps baited with EA interrupted catches of Ips avulsus (Eichhoff ) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: olytinae) in traps baited with SD at a distance of 2 m but not at distances of 6 or 12 m. In contrast, catches of I. avulsus and Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) in traps with EA were greatest in those traps spaced 2 m from the traps baited with SD and lowest at an inter–trap  distance of 12 m.  Similarly, catches of Monochamus titillator (F.) (Cerambycidae) in traps baited with EA were increased when spaced 2 m from traps baited with SD but not at a spacing of 6 or 12 m. The mean (6 SE) diversity of species in traps baited with EA was 19.1 6 0.5 species/trap and unaffected by distance to traps baited with SD. In contrast, the mean (6 SE) species diversity in SD traps was higher in traps 2 m from EA traps (12.8 6 0.8 species/trap) and lowest in traps 12 m EA traps (8.8 6 0.5 species/trap). More studies are needed to elucidate the interactions between volatiles emitted from different traps
on responses by flying beetles.

  • Citation: Miller, Daniel R.; Crowe, Christopher M. 2018. Effect of distance between baited multiple-funnel traps on catches of bark and wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Cerambycidae) and associates in North-Central Georgia . Journal of Entomological Science. 53(2): 268-277. 10 p. https://doi.org/10.18474/jes17-89.1.
  • Keywords: Ips avulsus, Monochamus titillator, Dendroctonus terebrans, pheromones, kairomones
  • Posted Date: July 16, 2018
  • Modified Date: September 4, 2018
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