Performance of eastern cottonwood and hybrid poplars on  alluvial and upland sites in the south

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Author(s): Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, Landis B.; Ogunlolu, Oludare S.
  • Date: 2018
  • Station ID: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)-SRS-2018

Abstract

Continued emphasis on woody biomass production under short rotation woody crop strategies has focused on both hybrid poplar and eastern cottonwood. The advantages of hybrid poplars in comparison to eastern cottonwood include superior rooting, better wood properties, and the ability to grow well on upland sites. Unfortunately, one specific disease, Septoria musiva, which results in stem canker and mortality, has shown to be the most serious impediment to the use of hybrid poplars in the Southern United States. Although disease still ranks as a significant problem in the Southern United States, a limited number of hybrid poplar clones have shown tolerance and changed the thinking about the use of hybrid poplars. In addition, a small population of eastern cottonwood clones has shown high survival and good growth on upland soils. New selections within parent populations may provide an even greater ability to develop more hybrid populations suited to the environment of the Southern United States.

  • Citation: Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, Landis B.; Ogunlolu, Oludare S. 2018. Performance of eastern cottonwood and hybrid poplars on  alluvial and upland sites in the south. In: Kirschman, Julia E., comp. 2018. Proceedings of the 19th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-General Technical Report SRS- 234. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 444 p (pages 207-212) 6 p.

Requesting Print Publications

Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

Publication Notes

  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
  • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.