Interactions between southern Ips bark beetle outbreaks, prescribed fire, and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) mortality

  • Authors: McNichol, Bailey H.; Montes, Cristián R.; Barnes, Brittany F.; Nowak, John T.; Villari, Caterina; Gandhi, Kamal J.K.
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Forest Ecology and Management
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2019.05.036

Abstract

The southeastern U.S. is considered the “wood-basket” of the world where loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations provide tremendous ecological and economic benefits to the region. These plantations are susceptible to various natural and anthropogenic abiotic and biotic stressors and disturbances. The southern pine engravers, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff), I. calligraphus (Germar), and I. grandicollis (Eichhoff), are considered secondary colonizers of stressed, damaged, and dying loblolly pines. However, they may undergo outbreaks and colonize live pine hosts if environmental conditions cause physiological stress to trees. In 2016,>230 concurrent Ips infestations>2 ha in size were documented in Georgia, U.S., reportedly due to severe drought. In these forests, prescribed burning is often conducted every 2–3 years to reduce fuel-loads, improve wildlife habitat, and manage understory vegetation. However, the effects of low-severity prescribed fire on active southern Ips infestations are unknown; fire may exacerbate or alleviate beetle outbreaks. Our objectives were to: (1) compare Ips infestations between burned and unburned sites to determine the short-term effects of prescribed fire on loblolly pine mortality; and (2) determine which site-level and tree-level variables were the best predictors of short-term levels of tree mortality. We monitored 838 pines on ten sites for eight months following prescribed fire in spring 2017. Overall, 69 (8%) trees died with 3.6 times higher tree mortality on unburned sites, and a higher probability of survival on burned sites. At the site-level, binomial logistic regression models including treatment (unburned versus burned) and time since burn were the best predictors of loblolly pine mortality. At the tree-level, model selection showed that treatment, crown mortality level (1–5), Ips activity level (none, low, medium, and high), and tree diameter provided the best predictions of mortality. Prescribed burning may thus help alleviate pest pressure and increase tree resilience in loblolly pine forests in the southeastern U.S.

  • Citation: McNichol, Bailey H.; Montes, Cristián R.; Barnes, Brittany F.; Nowak, John T.; Villari, Caterina; Gandhi, Kamal J.K. 2019. Interactions between southern Ips bark beetle outbreaks, prescribed fire, and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) mortality. Forest Ecology and Management. 446: 164-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2019.05.036.
  • Keywords: Fire, Forest health, Insect outbreaks, Model selection, Pine mortality
  • Posted Date: June 18, 2019
  • Modified Date: June 18, 2019
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