The Georgia Heirs Property Law Center, Inc.: Addressing Tangled Title and Economic Security for Georgians

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: StipeMaas, Skipper G.
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: Gaither, Cassandra J.; Carpenter, Ann; Lloyd McCurty, Tracy; Toering, Sara, eds. Heirs’ property and land fractionation: fostering stable ownership to prevent land loss and abandonment: proceedings of the meeting; 2017 June 15; Atlanta, GA. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-244. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Abstract

For each piece of heirs property, whether it is a home or a tract of land, there are multiple legal owners (usually descendants in a family), and no single owner can make major decisions for the property without everyone's agreement. Heirs property, which can be created with or without a will, is equivalent to having a pile of money in a glass box; a family can see their asset but cannot access its equity. For municipalities, this means that billions of dollars in valuable tax-appraised land is owned by a group of individuals where no one person has the legal authority to manage the property in such a way that benefits the family, let alone the tax base.

  • Citation: StipeMaas, Skipper G. 2019. The Georgia Heirs Property Law Center, Inc.: Addressing Tangled Title and Economic Security for Georgians. In: Gaither, Cassandra J.; Carpenter, Ann; Lloyd McCurty, Tracy; Toering, Sara, eds. Heirs’ property and land fractionation: fostering stable ownership to prevent land loss and abandonment: proceedings of the meeting; 2017 June 15; Atlanta, GA. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-244. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 98-104.
  • Posted Date: September 17, 2019
  • Modified Date: October 2, 2019
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.