Impacts and management implications of ice storms on forests in the southern United States

  • Authors: Bragg, Don C.; Shelton, Michael G; Zeide, Boris
  • Publication Year: 2003
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Forest Ecology and Management 186 (2003) 99–123

Abstract

Abstract: This review explores the ecological and silvicultural impacts of ice storms on forests in the southern United States. Different environmental factors like weather conditions, topography, vegetation, stand density, and management practices influence the degree of glaze damage a particular forest may experience. Additionally, the frequent contradictions in the relationships between these factors and the resulting damage suggests a complexity that makes each ice storm unique and difficult to predict. We recommend a series of silvicultural responses to ice storms, including density management, planting species selection, post-event evaluation, salvage, stand rehabilitation, and long-term monitoring of forest health.

  • Citation: Bragg, Don C.; Shelton, Michael G; Zeide, Boris 2003. Impacts and management implications of ice storms on forests in the southern United States. Forest Ecology and Management 186 (2003) 99–123
  • Keywords: catastrophic natural disturbance, forest recovery, glaze, salvage, stand rehabilitation
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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