Some effects of prescribed burning on coastal plain forest soil

  • Authors: Metz, Louis J.; Lotti, Thomas; Klawitter, Ralph A.
  • Publication Year: 1961
  • Publication Series: Other
  • Source: Station Paper SE-SP-133, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, N.C.

Abstract

A study was made from 1946 to 1956 of the effect of prescribed burning on soils beneath loblolly pine stands growing in the level, lower coastal plain of the Southeastern United States. Data were collected on two experimental areas located about 30 miles apart in South Carolina. The sites are comparable in that they have similar topography and surface soil texture. Annual and periodic fires over a ten-year period had no significant influence on the physical properties of the soil. Mineral elements, nitrogen, and organic matter tended to increase in the surface 4 inches of the burned plots. Conclusions drawn from this experiment can probably be applied to the flat, low-lying, sandy surface soils of the region.

  • Citation: Metz, Louis J.; Lotti, Thomas; Klawitter, Ralph A. 1961. Some effects of prescribed burning on coastal plain forest soil. USDA Forest Service Station Paper SE-SP-133, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, N.C. 10 p.
  • Posted Date: July 13, 2020
  • Modified Date: July 20, 2020
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