Effects of fertilization and irrigation on components of soil carbon efflux and soil respiration in loblolly pine plantations

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  • Authors: Anderson, Peter H.; Maier, Christopher A.
  • Publication Year: 2020
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station

Abstract

Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) evolution is a combined product of the metabolic activity of plant roots and both free-living and symbiotic heterotrophs. Soil CO2 efflux (Sf) rates are the second largest carbon flux in the global carbon cycle and the largest terrestrial contributor of CO2 (Raich and Schlesinger 1992). The components of Sf can be broken down into heterotrophic respiration (RH) and autotropic root respiration (RR). Quantifying Sf and understanding the contribution of RH and RR on intensively managed sites is fundamental to understanding the carbon cycle and implications for carbon sequestration (McElligott and others 2016).

  • Citation: Anderson, Peter H.; Maier, Christopher A. 2020. Effects of fertilization and irrigation on components of soil carbon efflux and soil respiration in loblolly pine plantations. In: Bragg, Don C.; Koerth, Nancy E.; Holley, A. Gordon, eds. 2020. Proceedings of the 20th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 174-176.
  • Keywords: soil, carbon flux, root respiration
  • Posted Date: September 15, 2020
  • Modified Date: November 18, 2020
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