Comparison of individual-tree competition metrics in an uneven-aged, baldcypress and black willow floodplain forest

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  • Authors: McAlhaney, Alicia L.; Keim, Richard F.; Allen, Scott T.
  • Publication Year: 2020
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station

Abstract

Forest competition is typically assessed at the stand scale, but metrics that account for individual-tree competition may be more useful for understanding controls over growth in disturbed stands with heterogeneous structure. We evaluated whether local competition measures and crown dimension measures in an uneven-aged floodplain forest were capable of accounting for the effect of competition on baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) and black willow (Salix nigra). Contrary to our hypothesized inverse relationships, various metrics of local competition and individual crown dimension variables were poorly correlated with each other for dominant and codominant trees of the two species. The variability between species and overall poor relationships were likely attributable to physiological and morphological differences, complex stand structure, and the relatively low levels of competition experienced by dominant and codominant trees.

  • Citation: McAlhaney, Alicia L.; Keim, Richard F.; Allen, Scott T. 2020. Comparison of individual-tree competition metrics in an uneven-aged, baldcypress and black willow floodplain forest. In: Bragg, Don C.; Koerth, Nancy E.; Holley, A. Gordon, eds. 2020. Proceedings of the 20th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 245-250.
  • Keywords: baldcypress, Taxodium distichum, black willow, Salix nigra, competition
  • Posted Date: September 15, 2020
  • Modified Date: November 18, 2020
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