Testing five treatments to control Lonicera and promote natural hardwood reproduction in north Alabama

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  • Authors: Schweitzer, Callie J.; Dey, Daniel C.
  • Publication Year: 2020
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station

Abstract

We partnered with the Land Trust of North Alabama to implement an invasive species treatment demonstration project on property with high recreational use. The stand had low-quality upland hardwoods with eight dominant or codominant tree species averaging 5.5 inches in diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) and 456 stems per acre (SPA). We treated honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) using mechanical removal, mechanical removal with cut stump herbicide application, foliar herbicide treatment, and a single dormant season prescribed fire, in addition to an untreated control area. The pretreatment density of Lonicera in all five treatment areas ranged from 11,000 to 15,300 SPA, which was 84 to 96 percent of all woody stems in the understory. Posttreatment SPA of Lonicera was 500 to 39,400, ranging from 16 to 98 percent of all understory stems. Foliar herbicide treatment was most effective in reducing Lonicera stems. Hardwood tree reproduction was depauperate.

  • Citation: Schweitzer, Callie J.; Dey, Daniel C. 2020. Testing five treatments to control Lonicera and promote natural hardwood reproduction in north Alabama. In: Bragg, Don C.; Koerth, Nancy E.; Holley, A. Gordon, eds. 2020. Proceedings of the 20th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–253. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 295-301.
  • Keywords: Lonicera, honeysuckle, control, herbicide
  • Posted Date: September 15, 2020
  • Modified Date: November 23, 2020
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