Wetland and hydric soils [Chapter 6]

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Trettin, Carl C.; Kolka, Randall K.; Marsh, Anne S.; Bansal, Sheel; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Megonigal, Patrick; Stelk, Marla J.; Lockaby, Graeme; D'Amore, David V; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Tangen, Brian; Chimner, Rodney; Gries, James
  • Publication Year: 2020
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: Forest and rangeland soils of the United States under changing conditions: A comprehensive science synthesis. Springer, Cham. p. 99-126
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-45216-2_6

Abstract

Soil and the inherent biogeochemical processes in wetlands contrast starkly with those in upland forests and rangelands. The differences stem from extended periods of anoxia, or the lack of oxygen in the soil, that characterize wetland soils; in contrast, upland soils are nearly always oxic. As a result, wetland soil biogeochemistry is characterized by anaerobic processes, and wetland vegetation exhibits specific adaptations to grow under these conditions. However, many wetlands may also have periods during the year where the soils are unsaturated and aerated. This fluctuation between aerated and nonaerated soil conditions, along with the specialized vegetation, gives rise to a wide variety of highly valued ecosystem services.

  • Citation: Trettin, Carl C.; Kolka, Randall K.; Marsh, Anne S.; Bansal, Sheel; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Megonigal, Patrick; Stelk, Marla J.; Lockaby, Graeme; D’Amore, David V.; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Tangen, Brian; Chimner, Rodney; Gries, James. 2020. Wetland and hydric soils [Chapter 6]. In: Pouyat, Richard V.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Patel-Weynand, Toral; Geiser, Linda H., editors. 2020. Forest and rangeland soils of the United States under changing conditions: A comprehensive science synthesis. Springer, Cham. p. 99-126.
  • Posted Date: December 3, 2020
  • Modified Date: January 27, 2021
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.