Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation

  • Authors: Coyle, David R.; Nowak, John T.; Fettig, Christopher J.
  • Publication Year: 2003
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: J. Entomol. Sci. 38(4): 621-630 (October 2003)

Abstract

The widespread application of intensive forest management practices throughout the southeastern U.S. has increased loblolly pine, pinus taeda L., yields and shortened conventional rotation lengths. Fluctuations in Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), population density and subsequent damage levels have been linked to variations in management intensity. We examined the effects of two practices, irrigation and fertilization, on R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights in an intensively-managed P. taeda plantation in South Carolina. Trees received intensive weed control and one of the following treatments: irrigation only, fertilization only, irrigation + fertilization, or control. Mean whole-tree tip moth damage levels ranged from R. frustrana on this experiment.

  • Citation: Coyle, David R.; Nowak, John T.; Fettig, Christopher J. 2003. Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation. J. Entomol. Sci. 38(4): 621-630 (October 2003)
  • Keywords: Growth impacts, intensive forestry, pine regeneration insects, Pinus taeda, Rhyacionia frustrana, silviculture
  • Posted Date: January 1, 2000
  • Modified Date: December 3, 2019
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.