Performing gas-exchange measurements on excised branches - evaluation and recommendations

  • Authors: Missik, J.E.C.; Oishi, A.C.; Benson, M.C.; Meretsky, V.J.; Phillips, R.P.; Novick, K.A.
  • Publication Year: 2021
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Photosynthetica
  • DOI: 10.32615/ps.2020.079

Abstract

In forest canopies, it is common to perform leaf-level gas-exchange measurements on recently excised branches, often without testing for excision-related biases. We conducted a formal test of excision effects using gas-exchange measurements from cut and uncut canopy branches of three deciduous hardwoods – sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), and white oak (Quercus alba L.). Across all species, excision immediately reduced photosynthesis and stomatal conductance by 27–62% relative to pre-excision rates. In white oak, which had particularly long (> 100 cm) vessels, gas exchange was more impaired for shorter (~ 30 cm) as compared to longer (~ 100 cm) branches. Additional hypotheses linking branch height and species water-use strategy to excision bias were tested but not confirmed. A survey of 23 previously published studies confirms that our results are not without precedent. Excision-related biases should be considered when interpreting measurements performed on excised branches.

  • Citation: Missik, J.E.C.; Oishi, A.C.; Benson, M.C.; Meretsky, V.J.; Phillips, R.P.; Novick, K.A. 2021. Performing gas-exchange measurements on excised branches - evaluation and recommendations. Photosynthetica. 59(1): 61-73. https://doi.org/10.32615/ps.2020.079.
  • Keywords: canopy physiology, cut branch, hydraulics, isohydricity, measurement bias, methodology
  • Posted Date: April 28, 2021
  • Modified Date: April 30, 2021
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