Chapter 2 - Broad-scale patterns of insect and disease activity across the 50 United States from the National Insect and Disease Survey, 2019

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Potter, Kevin M.; Paschke, Jeanine L.; Koch, Frank H.; Berryman, Erin M.
  • Publication Year: 2021
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-261

Abstract

Forest insects and diseases have widespread ecological and economic impacts on the forests of the United States and may represent the most serious threats to the Nation’s forests (Logan and others 2003, Lovett and others 2016, Tobin 2015). U.S. law therefore authorizes the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service to “conduct surveys to detect and appraise insect infestations and disease conditions and man-made stresses affecting trees and establish a monitoring system throughout the forests of the United States to determine detrimental changes or improvements that occur over time, and report annually concerning such surveys and monitoring” (FHP 2020). Insects and diseases cause changes in forest structure and function, species succession, and biodiversity, which may be considered negative or positive depending on management objectives (Edmonds and others 2011). Nearly all native tree species of the United States are affected by at least one injury-causing insect or disease agent, with exotic agents on average considerably more severe than native ones (Potter and others 2019a). Additionally, the genetic integrity of several native tree species is highly vulnerable to exotic diseases and insects (Potter and others 2019b).

  • Citation: Potter, Kevin M.; Paschke, Jeanine L.; Koch, Frank H.; Berryman, Erin M. 2021. Chapter 2 - Broad-scale patterns of insect and disease activity across the 50 United States from the National Insect and Disease Survey, 2019. In: Potter, K.M.; Conkling, B.L., eds. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis 2020. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-261. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 27-57.
  • Posted Date: August 5, 2021
  • Modified Date: August 9, 2021
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.