Chapter 8 - Determining what species regenerate in forest stands impacted by Heterobasidion root disease in Wisconsin and Michigan

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  • Authors: Hillstrom, Michael; Demchik, Michael; Sakalidis, Monique; Scanlon, Kyoko; Adams, Trevor; Minnix, Katherine
  • Publication Year: 2021
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-261

Abstract

Heterobasidion root disease (Heterobasidion irregulare; HRD) causes substantial pine (Pinus spp.) mortality in North America and other regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It first appeared in Wisconsin in 1993 and has since been documented in 28 counties. It was first documented in Michigan in 1963, and recent survey work found it was present in 19 counties. New infestations mainly occur when spores carried by wind land on freshly cut pine and spruce (Picea spp.) stumps. Expanding mortality gaps develop as the fungus spreads along interconnected roots. Treating cut conifer stumps with a fungicide effectively prevents HRD infestation.

  • Citation: Hillstrom, Michael; Demchik, Michael; Sakalidis, Monique; Scanlon, Kyoko; Adams, Trevor; Minnix, Katherine. 2021. Chapter 8 - Determining what species regenerate in forest stands impacted by Heterobasidion root disease in Wisconsin and Michigan. In: Potter, K.M.; Conkling, B.L., eds. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis 2020. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-261. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 157-159.
  • Posted Date: August 6, 2021
  • Modified Date: August 9, 2021
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