Composition and structure of reproduction in group selection openings after 20 years in a southern Appalachian mixed-hardwood forest

Abstract

Following harvests by even-aged methods in mixed-hardwood forests, desirable oak (Quercus spp. L.) reproduction can be quickly overtopped by shade-intolerant pioneer species. In a long-term, operational-scale study of uneven-aged management by group selection, we inventoried 10- and 20-year-old reproduction following two harvest entries in a mature, dry-mesic southern Appalachian upland hardwood stand. Our study objectives included evaluating the species composition and structure of reproduction in relation to opening size (0.05 ha to 0.41 ha), position in openings (center or edge), uneven-aged diameter structure, and evidence supporting the delayed oak dominance hypothesis. Opening size had no effect on reproduction from either entry. After 10 years (but not 20) yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) stem density and basal area were greater in opening centers; oaks were greater at edges. Position did not affect red maple (Acer rubrum L.) or other tolerant species. Diversity significantly increased between 10 and 20 years, suggesting evidence supporting the delayed oak dominance hypothesis. Early results from this study suggest that small openings can be used to regenerate desirable midtolerant and intolerant species in Appalachian mixed-hardwood stands on intermediate quality sites where uneven-aged stand structure is important for timber management and other goals such as visual appearance and early successional habitat.

  • Citation: McNab, W Henry; Oprean, Theodore M. 2021. Composition and structure of reproduction in group selection openings after 20 years in a southern Appalachian mixed-hardwood forest. Forest Science. 67(3): 335-346. https://doi.org/10.1093/forsci/fxab001.
  • Keywords: dominance hypothesis, group selection, opening size, Quercus, self-thinning
  • Posted Date: September 3, 2021
  • Modified Date: September 7, 2021
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