How can we learn more about the Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea)

  • Authors: Hamel, Paul B.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Keyser, Patrick D.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: The Auk 121(1):7-14, 2004

Abstract

A sense of urgency attends the study of species of concern, like the cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea). Sharpened by Robbins and others in 1992 and Hamel in 1992, such concern prompted the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to commission a status assessment of the cerulean warbler. Shortly after the status review was published, a petition was delivered to the USFWS urging that the species be listed as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The account of the cerulean warbler in the Birds of North America series also appeared that year. Substantial attention is currently focused on the species, and the Cerulean Warbler Technical Group (CWTG) was formed in 2002.

This article's overview consists of two parts. The first attempts to summarize current knowledge and suggest productive avenues to pursue in our efforts to understand the biology and conserve populations of cerulean warblers. The second part summarizes the structure and priorities of the CWTG, an organization that can spur and facilitate research and conservation action directed at this species and serve as a model for conservation of other forest birds.

  • Citation: Hamel, Paul B.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Keyser, Patrick D. 2004. How can we learn more about the Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea). The Auk 121(1):7-14, 2004
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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